Photo Friday: Chocolate at the Heritage Museum

Regular readers will know I love chocolate. Dark chocolate specifically. So when the Tea Tree Gully Heritage Museum organised a display revolving around the history of chocolate, I was in! And so was my editor, Sharon. Time for a road trip!

The heritage museum is housed in the building and grounds of the old Highercombe Hotel, built in 1853-4. It has hosted council meetings, dances and public meetings and served as  a school from 1875-1934, with the front half of the building becoming the post office in 1879. (More information is on their webpage.)

Each room was set up with facts, history and information on chocolate... original packaging and posters... and some famous chocolate quotes. Volunteers had been busy making visual chocolate treats, scattered throughout the house. Some real...

 

... like this top hat decorated with chocolate trim and Cocoa Chanel with her chocolate-inspired accessories. Chocolate even replaced the corks on this hat.

Some, like these delicious-looking felt treats, were not so real. Finally we climbed back down stairs for some morning tea and homemade chocolatey treats. Thanks to the volunteers at the Tea Tree Gully Heritage Museum for a lovely (and educational) morning.

Photos ©2017 Karen Carlisle. All rights reserved.

Ed: I originally discovered the Highercombe Hotel and Steventon (now Tea Tree Gully) post office during my research for my short story, Hunted.

Photo Friday: Curious Beasts and Where I Found Them

Inspired by the recent film, we went in search of amazing beasts at the South Australian Museum's recent exhibition: Curious Beasts. The exhibit bookends British Museum Animal prints - woodcuts and engravings from the 1400s through to the 1800s - neatly with specimen exhibits from the SA Museum. Art meets science - perfect!   And more amazing beasts lie within the museum walls.

 

From the sea...

   

From indigenous art... and treasures formed in our past (the largest opalised fossil)

  

and joined us for lunch.

Curious Beasts exhibition ends the first week of February.

Photos:©2016 Karen J Carlisle All Rights Reserved.

My London Cheat Sheet (Research List)

Australian speculative fiction writer, Narrelle Harris, recently wrote a blog post on A Cheat Sheet to London, with useful information links to aide in writing stories set in London. I've now added a few more books and websites to my 'go-to' research list. Fortunately I have visited once, albeit a flying visit. Still, writing steampunk stories based in London is a challenge for me - being a non-Londoner myself.

A big thank you to Narrelle for sharing her lists used to write her most recent Sherlock Holmes story, The Adventure of the Colonial Boy. Here's my list (concentrating on 19th century London) in return.

Where am I?

Though I write alternate history and fiddle with London's layout, I base my stories on maps of nineteenth century London. I use a combination of webpages and books to research the architecture and walk the streets of my London.

booth-map

House and Home and Social London

Victoria and the Royal Court

Murder & Mayhem - history and technology of Crime

Share your cheat sheet/research list

Now it's your turn. What resources (books, webpages) do you recommend for the non-Londoner writing stories set in London?

Narrelle Harris is the author of Walking in the Shadows, The Opposite of Life and, more recently penned a Sherlock Holmes mystery, The Adventure of the Colonial Boy published by Improbable Press.

 Photos:©2016 Karen J Carlisle. All Rights Reserved.